Smuggled lion cubs will find sanctuary outside Somalia

The Times of London
Mogadishu, Somalia

Mog moggies

The resuced cubs have been named Grumpy and Scar (Times photographer, Peter Nicholls)

Two female lion cubs discovered aboard a ship in Mogadishu and cared for by foreign contractors in the war-torn city are soon to escape Somalia for the safety of a nature sanctuary.

Grumpy and Scar, as they have been nicknamed, were found and confiscated by port authorities in late February. Continue reading Smuggled lion cubs will find sanctuary outside Somalia

Uneasy tension that lurks in the shadows

The Times of London
Mogadishu, Somalia

Every night soldiers on Mogadishu’s front line take incoming fire. At a camp for thousands of famine refugees, two men are arrested wearing suicide vests. On a busy street, an explosion kills three civilians, and in a warehouse a bomb factory is discovered.

Somalia’s Islamist insurgents, al-Shabaab, withdrew from Mogadishu two weeks ago but they have not gone. Continue reading Uneasy tension that lurks in the shadows

Death is ever present in Somali capital

The Times of London
Mogadishu, Somalia

For years Mogadishu has been a byword for war and chaos.

But the withdrawal of Islamist militants and a massive influx of tired, hungry and traumatised people is turning the Somali capital into a city of beggars and shelters.

Yet there is one constant that threads through Mogadishu’s recent miserable past — death is ever present. Continue reading Death is ever present in Somali capital

Death march: the skeletal children who bear witness to a growing catastrophe

The Times of London
Dadaab, Kenya

Dadaab kid
Hanad, a six-month-old boy, is being treated at the refugee camp in Dadaab (Tristan McConnell for The Times)

Spectral figures emerging from Kenya’s eastern wastelands are the just-living proof of Somalia’s famine. Every day, more than a thousand of them trudge into the sprawling refugee camps that surround the town of Dadaab, wrapped in incongruous colourful robes that billow in the constant wind sweeping across an impossibly hostile landscape of sand, thorn and stone.

Their feet are cracked and bent from days, sometimes weeks, of walking, their emaciated forms appearing on the outskirts of the camps singly or in diminished family groups.

The refugees left their homes to escape death by starvation or at the hands of a vicious Islamist army, but death has followed many of them here.

Continue reading Death march: the skeletal children who bear witness to a growing catastrophe